BRUISED, HURTING AND DIRTY: THE MISSIONARY CHURCH OF POPE FRANCIS

This is one of the best commentaries I have read to date on someone’s take on the vision of Pope Francis for the church.  It is a long read but well worth it.  I found it quite uplifting.  After you click on the link below to continue reading, the website you go to after the jump has a place to click if you want to listen.  This was the text of a talk give by Christopher Hale to DCCatholics Theology on Tap, a program where speakers present at a bar where a lot of young folks go.  This website, Millenial Journal, is becoming one of my favorite sites.  Geared mainly towards young folks, it has some really great posts, such as this one…..Reyanna

By Christopher Hale, August 18, 2014, Millennial Journal On-line

Thank you, Jonathan, for the introduction. First let me say that it’s a joy to be with you tonight. I’m particularly grateful to be here at St. Ignatius Church as we celebrate together our archdiocese’s 75th anniversary. As you might know, St. Ignatius is one of the oldest continually existing Catholic parishes in North America and in the United States. Founded by the great Jesuit missionary, Father Andrew White, in 1641, this parish serves as a great testimony about what it means to be that missionary Church that Jesus longs for us to be: a Church on the margins, a poor Church that is for the poor, a Church that heals wounds and warm hearts, a Church that is always a place of mercy and hope, where everyone is welcomed, loved and forgiven. The fruits of Father White’s ministry are due to his Jesuit charism, expressed so well by an early companion of Ignatius: “We [Jesuits] are not monks. The world is our cloister! The world is our house!”

Today, another Jesuit comes to mind when we think about the idea of a missionary Church: Pope Francis, the Bishop of Rome. Francis tells us that we are to be the Father Andrew Whites of today: missionary disciples of the Lord Jesus. But how can this be? We are men and women of the world, with families, jobs, and responsibilities. We aren’t missionaries. (To continue reading, click here.)

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